Call For Papers


Monday 22 and Tuesday 23 September 2014
University of Melbourne

Deadline for abstracts extended until Sunday 20 July 2014. Keynote speakers: Professor John M. Ganim, University of California, Riverside, on medieval cosmopolitanism and Dr. Brigid Rooney, University of Sydney, on cosmopolitan suburbia.

‘Cosmopolitanism’ connotes a dynamic, eclectic and sophisticated cultural sphere, one that transcends borders and national differences.  Although the term is an ancient one, deriving from the Greek word kosmopolitês, its meaning has never been stable.  The notion of the cosmopolitan is glamorous and in some respects elitist, suggesting a ‘luxuriously free-floating view from above’ (Bruce Robbins, Cosmopolitics, 1998).  At the same time, it has utopian connotations of pluralism and universality.

In the last decade or so, discourses of cosmopolitanism have experienced a resurgence.  The term is increasingly associated with multiculturalism, diasporic culture and the impact of globalisation.  Critics have advocated new forms of ‘rooted’, ‘vernacular’, postcolonial and even ‘refugee’ cosmopolitanism, in an attempt to break away from Eurocentric canons and outmoded nation-based identity politics.  But do these new accounts of cosmopolitanism resolve the tension between its egalitarian and elitist impulses?  Are aspirations to cosmopolitanism still, as Simon Gikandi suggests, ‘an essential mark of bourgeois identity and privilege’?

This conference invites participants to explore cosmopolitanism, both as a utopian project and as an object of critique. While the focus of the conference is on literature and literary criticism, we welcome papers addressing theatre, the visual arts, popular culture, translation and other forms of cultural expression in either contemporary or historical settings.  We also strongly encourage contributions from creative writers.  Presenters may choose to focus on Australian cosmopolitanisms or address broader categories such as the postcolonial or the transnational.

Topics for discussion might include:
- old and new cosmopolitanisms (including the influence of classical, medieval and early modern texts on more recent understandings of the cosmopolitan)
- cosmopolitan sensibilities in colonial, postcolonial and diasporic literatures
- cosmopolitanism and class - cosmopolitanism and the metropolitan/regional
- feminist engagements with cosmopolitanism
- cosmopolitanism and sexuality
- cosmopolitanism, advertising, popular culture and everyday life
- transnationalism and globalisation, parochialism and provinciality
- cosmopolitan readerships and polities; the role of translation
- creative practice and the cosmopolitan - the text as a cosmopolitan space
- utopianism and cosmopolitan futures
The convenors welcome abstracts from postgraduate and early career researchers working in any field of the humanities, particularly literary studies, creative writing, theatre studies, history (including art history), cultural studies and translation studies.

For further details, please visit the conference website:

http://www.viewfromaboveconference.com/

and submit your abstract to: viewfromaboveconference@gmail.com by Sunday 20 July.

Supported by the Faculty of Arts, the School of Culture and Communication and the Australian Centre at the University of Melbourne, the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (Melbourne), the Association for the Study of Australian Literature and Deakin University.

 

School of English, Media Studies and Art History, The University of Queensland
29-30 September 2014, St Lucia, Brisbane.

The investigation of things has comprised an important subject across many disciplines in the humanities and social sciences over the last thirty years. In 1988’s The Social Life of Things, Arjun Appadurai provided an innovative exploration of how things, as commodities, shaped their human agents, rather than the other way round—an idea that would have important repercussions for a new scholarly interest in material cultures. More recently, in attempting to illuminate the problematic notion of a “Thing Theory,” Bill Brown has pointed to the complex relationship between objects and things, arguing that things in fact lie outside a simple subject-object framework, leading a shadowy and multifaceted “life” which humans only glimpse rather than truly see.

The 18th annual Work In Progress (WIP) is a postgraduate conference addressing the theme of “The Life of Things” from disciplines within the humanities including literary and cultural studies, ?lm, media and communication studies, drama, art history, and writing.

Con?rmed speakers include Richard Read, Winthrop Professor in the School of Architecture, Landscape and Visual Arts at the University of Western Australia;Gillian Whitlock, ARC Professorial Fellow in the School of English, Media Studies and Art History at the University of Queensland; and Gay Hawkins, Director of the Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies at the University of Queensland.

The organising committee of WIP 2014 invite proposals for 20-minute papers on any aspect of this theme. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

-Thing Theory

-The Art of Things: Objects and Aesthetic Regimes

-The Contemplation of Things: the Re?ective Mind and the Outside World

-Immaterial Things: Virtual Worlds, Inner Worlds

-Things and Gender/Gendering Things

-Natural and Unnatural Things: Eco-criticism and its Discontents

-The Heritage of Things: Life Stories of the Non-Living

-The Ineffableness of Things: the Struggle between Words and Worlds

-Anthropomorphising Things

-Merging and Mutable Things: Hybridity and Metamorphosis

-The Resurgent Banal?: The Everyday and Things

-It-Narratives: Things as Textual Agents

-The Structure of Things: Assemblages and Networks

-The Ascendancy of Things: Hierarchies, Obsolescence

-Worldly Things: Transnationalism, Diaspora and Identity

-Things Fall Apart: The Meanings of Destruction

-The Non-Sense of Things: Forgery, Fraud and Hoaxes

-À la recherche du temps perdu: Things and Memory

 

Please email abstracts (of 250 words) accompanied by a short biographical note (50 words) to:

UQWiP2014@gmail.com by 31 JULY 2014.

More information is available on the website:

http://www.emsah.uq.edu.au/index.html?page=212309&pid=177854.

 

After the success of the Listening Between the Lines Symposium, held at Monash University on 13 June 2014 we wish to extend our call for papers to invite submissions for a special issue of Australian Literary Studies on this topic, with a projected publication date of June 2015.

Recent studies in interdisciplinarity have offered the hypothesis that cross-disciplinary research may be understood as a form of “cultural exchange” taking place between academic terrains that are not always accustomed to the codes and rituals of the other. If this principle of exchange is applied to the relations between literature and music, it has the potential to facilitate a dialogue between the disciplines and point the way towards new research possibilities. Since there are any number of aesthetic forms that can combine music and words, we invite submissions from literary studies, creative writing, musicology, ethnomusicology, performance studies, film and television, translation studies, or any number of other disciplines that may touch upon them both.

We invite articles of approximately 5000–6000 words to be submitted by 1 October, 2014. Please note that unsolicited submissions will be accepted for consideration. In these cases, however, please submit an abstract first. Submission Guidelines:

-All submissions will be double-blind peer reviewed

-Australian Literary Studies follows the current edition of the MLA Handbook, using parenthetical documentation and a list of Works Cited. Where an essay makes extensive use of unpublished materials, it is preferable to use footnotes to reference this material.

-Single inverted commas are used.

-Submissions should be double-spaced.

-The name and contact details of the author, including postal address, should appear on a separate cover page.

-Contributions should be saved as a Word file or an .rtf file (authorname.doc or authorname.rtf)

-Essays should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration elsewhere.

 

Submissions should be marked “ALS – special journal issue” and sent to:

christian.griffiths@monash.edu.

 

Colloquy: Text, Theory, Critique is seeking submissions for its 28th issue, which will be a general issue and will be published in December 2014. Colloquy is a peer-reviewed online journal published twice annually by postgraduate students in the Literary and Cultural Studies Graduate Research Program at Monash University. It publishes material in the areas of critical theory, philosophy, cultural studies, film and television, communications and media studies, and performance. It also accepts translations, creative writing, and book reviews which can also be peer reviewed. Postgraduate students and early career researchers are strongly encouraged to submit. All work is double-blind refereed by experts in the field.

The deadline for submissions for Issue 28 is 30 June 2014. Articles should be between 6,000 and 10,000 words and should follow the Chicago Manual of Style with Australian spelling. Please provide a short abstract, up to 5 keywords and your current affiliation in your email and forward your submissions to: arts-colloquy@monash.edu.

Further submission guidelines can be found at: http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/colloquy/submissions/.

Monash Social Aesthetics Research Network
Friday 13 June 2014
Monash University, Caulfield Campus, T2.26/T2.27

From lullabies to laments, from the Song of Solomon to the music of Lady Gaga, the interactions between literature and music are so ubiquitous they often go unnoticed. Considering the obviously interdisciplinary nature of the question, it is perhaps surprising that few studies have attempted to approach this relationship through an application of interdisciplinary theory. Recent studies in interdisciplinarity have offered the hypothesis that cross-disciplinary research may be understood as a form of “cultural exchange” taking place between academic terrains that are not always accustomed to the codes and rituals of the other. If this principle of cultural exchange is applied to literature and music, it has the potential to facilitate a mutual understanding between the disciplines and point the way towards new research possibilities.

This symposium aims to enact such a cultural exchange by gathering research that blends musical and literary topics in diverse and novel ways. We encourage papers that explicitly address the disciplinary relationship between music and literature, and also those that outline the methodologies of one discipline for the edification of the other. Since there are any number of aesthetic forms that can combine music and words, we invite submissions from any literary studies, creative writing, musicology, ethnomusicology, performance studies, film and television, translation studies, or any number of other disciplines that may touch upon them. Some possible areas of investigation may include:

- The links between music and literature in early civilisations
- The importance of literary text in the contexts of world musics
- The strategies involved in setting poetic texts in “art-song” or as “programme” music
- The social functions of lyrics in popular music genres
- The challenges surrounding the lingual and cultural translation of song lyrics
- The use of music as rhetorical device in performance media, such as film and theatre
- The appropriation of musical imagery in poetry
- The use of musical concepts as structural principles in the composition of poetry
- The blending of literature and music in other aesthetic contexts (theatre, film, religion, etc.)

Proposals are invited for 20-minute papers. Please send abstract (no more than 250 words) and a short biography to christian.griffiths@monash.edu by 1 May 2014. Please also advise organisers of any A/V requirements and/or dietary preferences (for catering purposes).

Symposium Organisers:
Christian Griffiths, Anthea Skinner, Angela Tiziana Tarantini, Dr Paul Watt.

NB – The organisers are planning to publish a selection of these papers as a special journal issue. However, a separate call for papers will be issued for this purpose.

A PDF flyer is available here.

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